Search Results for: tibetan Buddhism

How western Buddhism has changed in 50 years

…inctions between monks and lay people does not fit in with modern society and western monastic orders are relatively scarce. Non-monastic practitioners are often very serious and they power the various Buddhist movements. 3. Tibetan Buddhism has baggage. Tibetan lamas arriving in the 1970s seemed to fulfil our Shangri-La fantasies. But, along with inspiration and wisdom, they also brought sectarian disputes, shamanism, the “reincarnate…

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When China Rules the World: And What it Means for Buddhism

…e have survived Communism and the Cultural Revolution. When China Rules the World argues that China is not leaving behind its cultural past as it modernises, but drawing it into a new kind of modernity. The future of Chinese Buddhism is bound to be a central factor is the future of Buddhism as a whole if only because of the sheer scale of everything in China. Taiwanese Buddhism is a significant presence in Buddhist Asia, but China’s population…

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Greek Buddha

…radically, it suggests that this offers dramatic new evidence of the true character of Early Buddhism. But do its claims stack up? This is a highly ambitious book on the Greek philosopher Pyrrho and his relationship to Early Buddhism, and more significantly on Early Buddhism itself. But it is also very problematic. I would encourage anyone interested in the elusive question of the nature of the historical Buddha’s teaching, and the early…

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The Future of Buddhism in the West

…st tradition as a whole. The meeting of theBuddhist traditions on this level will augment popular eclecticism and we shall see more of what Joseph Goldstein in his book, One Dharma (reviewed here) calls ‘the emerging western Buddhism’: a new, pragmatic non-denominational form of Buddhism. We have aslready seen many developments in western Zen, Western Vajrayana and western Theravada and we shall doubtless see many more. The third development…

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When a Buddhist Becomes a Catholic – Reflections on Paul Williams’ Conversion

…an emotional conviction, and psychological orientation. And one of the Buddha’s most important teachings is that our views (ditthis) grow from our emotions. He belongs to the generation of baby-boomers who encountered Buddhism in their youth and are now the leaders of western Buddhism. I hear Williams’ concerns echoed by others of his generation who are now entering their last third of life, and are confronted by its end. Ralph…

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