Search Results for: tibetan Buddhism

Integrating Dharma Practice: An Interview With Gil Fronsdal

…ere left behind. I don’t expect the major centres to drift further away from Buddhism – just the reverse. But some groups run by newer teachers may not be influenced by these trends, and might well move away from Buddhism altogether. The Buddhism we are discovering is not just Theravada, though. For instance, there has been a big Tibetan influence, and most American Vipassana teachers feel a deep, heartfelt response to the…

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Dharma Life Magazine

…sense the magazine will be spiritually committed. I am also determined to encourage people to speak for themselves. Real Dharma Dharma Life is a magazine written and largely produced by committed Buddhists. It is not ‘about’ Buddhism in an academic way. Nor is it hoping to popularize Buddhism, by linking it to spiritual fashions in a New Age manner. Its editorial policy is founded firmly on the principles of Buddhism and the experience of…

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Buddhism’s Happiness Agenda

…g by adjusting our attitudes and behaviour. The Happiness Movement urges us to help others, keep learning and have a positive approach, and over the years I’ve tried to follow similar advice from the Buddha. However, I think Buddhism has something distinctive to contribute to the debate. Buddhism starts with the fundamental character of human existence. Everything we experience, it says, is impermanent and constantly changing. That’s true of our…

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Learning the Harsh Way at the Croydon Buddhist Centre

…ence was different in Dharma study groups. When I first read the writings of Sangharakshita, founder of the FWBO, I found them hugely stimulating. I loved his rigour, intelligence and ability to make bold connections between Buddhism and western ideas. But if I raised questions about his teachings, or Buddhism in general, to Croydon Order members, I was met with perplexity or disapproval. I was expected quietly to take in what I was being taught…

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Buddhism and Drugs

…ly want to chill out, escape stress and access a state of mellow relaxation. Some say it’s natural: a herb, not a drug and an alternative to harried modern living. In fact, some believe, it’s rather like meditation. However, Buddhism has five main ethical precepts and the last is ‘abstaining from intoxicants’. This isn’t a rigorous prohibition, and Buddhists aren’t always strictly teetotal or drug-free. It’s a ‘principle of training’, as we say,…

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