Author: Vishvapani

Faith in the Buddha

Buddhists often talk about Enlightenment, but what does it mean? The Buddha is the object of faith in Buddhism, so in what are we placing our faith? Vishvapani (who has written a book about the Buddha) explores these questions and talks about what faith in the Buddha means for him. Cardiff Buddhist Centre, 23:04:17 (30 mins) Faith in the Buddha by Vishvapani...

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The Meaning of Faith

Faith is ‘the first of the five spiritual faculties’ taught by the Buddha; but in English it has many associations – ‘blind faith’, ‘leaps of faith’, faith as the alternative to ‘reason’ and so on. Vishvapani speaks about what faith means for Buddhists in and how it relates to other important qualities such as reason and imagination. Cardiff Buddhist Centre Sangha Night 01:02:2018 The Meaning of Faith by...

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The Skill of Ethics

Education focuses more and more on learning skills. The Buddhist idea of ethics as skilfulness makes a link between ordinary skills and he rely of ethics and spiritual life. Skill and Skilfulness - Thought for the Day 30.01.2018 by Vishvapani http://www.wiseattention.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/tftd180130.mp3 On yesterday’s programme we heard from apprentices at Sheffield University who start at 16 and are trained all the way to degree level in skills that equip them to work in industry. The presenter commented on the trainees’ energy and enthusiasm; the apprentices said how important it was to know they have a clear path to a good...

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Poverty Safari – Review

Poverty Safari is an eloquent account of poverty and the dangers and delusions that await people who emerge from it into a media spotlight. Change, he suggests, needs start with people.

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Rediscovering the Buddha in Thailand

What did the Buddha look like? And why does it matter? At the Rediscovering the Buddha Seminar in Bangkok Vishvapani joined leading scholars to advise a Thai artist  on the Buddha’s appearance.   23-28 November 2017 I have just returned from Bangkok, where I participated in a seminar entitled ‘Rediscovering the Buddha’ along with a group of scholars from around the world. This was a distinctive event: a gathering of academics (along with me and a Chinese Buddhist teacher, who aren’t academics), but not an academic conference; and the occasion for a discussion of historical issues concerning the Buddha, but with an overarching aim that isn’t really historical at all. The underlying impetus was artistic and religious. Sunti Pichetchaiyakul is reportedly the most famous artist in Thailand, a young man who works in the Thai hyperrealist tradition and takes it to new levels of care and detail. He made his name with an uncannily lifelike sculpture of a well-known Thai monk, which shows him warts, wrinkles, pockmarks and all. The statue sat beside us in the seminar room, eerily resembling an extra participant. Sunti’s aim is to create a similarly realistic image of the Buddha, which means showing him as an historical figure; and just as his sculpture goes to extraordinary lengths to recreate physical detail, his project has turned into six years (and counting) of research into the...

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